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Rumi: Do you not know why your mirror

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Rumi: Do you not know why your mirror
  
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Do you not know why your mirror does not reflect?

Because the rust has not been removed from its face.

 

(Rumi)

 
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Photo: Carpet from around the Holy Ka'aba sold at www.RumisGarden.co.uk
      
Carpet from around the Holy Ka'aba sold at www.RumisGarden.co.uk   

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'Masnavi of Rumi, The, Vol 1: A New Annotated Edition and Translation' By Alan Williams (Author) 

 

​Recommended Reading:

'Masnavi of Rumi, The, Vol 1: A New Annotated Edition and Translation'
By Alan Williams (Author)

Purchase Book:

Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk

Description:
 
Jalaloddin Rumi's Masnavi-ye Ma'navi, or 'Spiritual Couplets', composed in the 13th Century, is a monumental work of poetry in the Sufi tradition of Islamic mysticism. For centuries before his love poetry became a literary phenomenon in the West, Rumi's Masnavi had been revered in the Islamic world as its greatest mystical text. Drawing upon a vast array of characters, stories and fables, and deeply versed in spiritual teaching, it takes us on a profound and playful journey of discovery along the path of divine love, toward its ultimate goal of union with the source of all Truth. In Book 1 of the Masnavi, the first of six volumes, Rumi opens the spiritual path towards higher spiritual understanding. Alan Williams's authoritative new translation is rendered in highly readable blank verse and includes the original Persian text for reference, and with explanatory notes along the way. True to the spirit of Rumi's poem, this new translation establishes the Masnavi as one of the world's great literary achievements for a global readership. Translated with an introduction, notes and analysis by Alan Williams and including the Persian text edited by Mohammad Este'lami.
 

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